“Years back, we first saw Lutz Huelle as a fresh-faced young man in Wolfgang Tillman’s iconic photographs, we did not know who he was or where he came from, but those images stuck in our minds. Next time, we saw the same young man taking a bow after a fashion show in Paris named after a Smiths song, full of quietly beautiful yet empowering clothes, which he continues to create in his Parisian studio. By minding his own business and staying true to himself, he embodies what the current mood in fashion is so desperately trying to find. Honesty, Realness and Creativity.” Robin Schulie talks to Lutz for SSAW Magazine, Spring 2016 issue

LUTZ HUELLE F/W 2016 ‘Adding volume to the body without oversizing it. Tripling the front panels of a tailored coat in camel and a red sleeveless trench in wool, causing its volume to overspill. Denim jackets go from simple breasted to “triple breasted”, by adding length they become asymmetrical, sweeping coats. The same was done to my beloved bombers: adding contrasting panels and finishings in double wool, they turn into a new sort of trench coat, combining the strength and attitude of the former with the sophistication of the latter. Denim is also combined with fluid crepe or gold sequins for dresses that go from early morning listening to late night dancing in the flicker of an eye. The same sequins, worn as oversized earrings add sparkle to even the simplest of looks. Pleated dresses are finished with jersey, adding the ease of sportswear to evening. Finally, a group of zipped overskirts in light wool, pinstripe and denim act as oversized belts, cinching volume at the waist of dresses and shirts. The same skirts, cut in transparent plastic, protect dresses or pants in an eventual burst of rain, a sort of “dress-umbrella”. To cut a long story short – this collection became about everything I have always loved, a sort of concentrate of my favourite obsessions.’

“To hear Lutz Huelle speak about his clothes is to be on the receiving end of all sorts of mini revelations. To wit: “I like that something appears sexy because the person inside it decides it is going to be sexy.” The supporting evidence: a trench coat or gray jersey tunic that could be unzipped from the shoulder down the arm. Or else he’ll consider how a garment might exist in a fixed seductive state of sliding off the body; this he did by suspending the core of black parka from diamanté straps, flipping its raison d’être from outerwear to evening attire. Huelle operates from the premise that his designs need to end up being worn; otherwise, as he puts it, “What’s the point?” But his application of elasticized seaming to alter volumes, or the flapper fringing spilling forth from a boxy blazer also backed up his belief in “eccentric simplicity.” Amy Verner on S/S 2016 , Vogue Runway

http://www.vogue.com/fashion-shows/spring-2016-ready-to-wear/lutz-huelle To hear Lutz Huelle speak about his clothes is to be on the receiving end of all sorts of … More

‘The Best German Fashion Designers’ Markus Ebner on Lutz Huelle @Goethe Institute: ‘Whoever markets his fashion for fifteen years simply under the first name “Lutz,” as Lutz Huelle does, likes to stick to essentials. He needs neither distant historical periods nor geographical preference for inspiration: he finds it solely in the garment itself. Huelle works away with painstaking attention to details, transforming them in unconventional ways and modernizing their traditional function without much fuss –but with high standards, especially for himself. Perhaps this is one of the reasons why the designer, who was born in Remscheid, and his collections were always better located in Paris – where he has lived for quite some time – than in Germany. Lutz Huelle made a name for himself in the nineties as Wolfgang Tillman’s model and is a mainstay of the photo artist’s creative gang.’

  https://www.goethe.de/en/kul/des/20406879.html