“…this whole notion of old and new is completely gone, in a way, because a beautiful garment is a beautiful garment…there’s no rule about how people dress these days,” the designer observed backstage before the show. Taking full advantage of this welcome state of affairs, he offered a lineup of deconstructed jean jackets, bombers with ruffles or drawn tight to the waist with a Fifties New Look flair, and, what he claimed to be his first jacquard cocktail dress. This, he tucked under a trenchcoat and, in a pin-striped version, layered on top of matching trousers. (..) The alligator print was very chic. So were the polka dots (..) applied to a dress paired with matching boots. The added measure of elegance overall contributed to the strength of this forward-looking collection.” Mimosa Spencer on LUTZ HUELLE SS19 on WWD

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LUTZ HUELLE S/S 2018 “I was thinking about how there is no more generational gap in how we dress – Mothers dressing like their daughters, daughters raiding the closets of their mothers (or their fathers !), and how even the idea of “old” or “new” seems old today. So, this collection became about a certain classicism or even elegance put into the context of how we dress today. A Trenchcoat in pure cotton has its sleeves cut into an exaggerated Bell shape to add a sense of drama to a simple wardrobe staple. A Jacquard cocktail Dress (a first for me !) is worn under a men’s Trench or cut in Pinstripe wool over matching pants. Coats with oversized sleeves and tiny shoulders cut in classic motifs of roses, dots, or animalier are worn over sweatshirts or oversized men’s shirts. Denim Jackets and Bombers have swathes of Jacquard ruffles attached to the front or are cut into tiny waisted Jackets. Worn with fluid skirts they transform the classic silhouette of fitted jacket and skirt. Finally, a men’s shirt and classic dotted blouse have their front panels twisted to reveal the body underneath in an unexpected way.”

“..auf den ersten Blick mag es vielleicht verwundern, dass Lutz Huelle begeistert von Dingen wie einer Chanel-Jacke reden kann. Dabei macht er ja genau das Gleiche wie einst Coco Chanel, als sie die Jacke erfand: Er erschafft neue Klassiker aus dem Vorhandenen, das Chanel-Kostüm des 21. Jahrhunderts, wenn man so will.” Hella Schneider on Lutz Huelle’s Show at Berghain, on VOGUE Germany

to read the whole article, please click here Auf Einladung des Fashion Council Germany kam der deutsche Designer, der seit…

“For the designer Lutz Huelle, combining fabrics or garments has become a signature, and a way of expressing difference. “We are not as simple as fashion wants us to be,” he says. “We are more complex. It makes you question.” Huelle founded his own label in 2000, after working closely with Martin Margiela, and his AW18 show had blue denim jackets sliced on the horizontal and matched with black brocade, and wool coats with vertical panels of metallic quilted lining. “It demands the person wearing it to be really open,” says Huelle. “When I first started doing it, it was difficult for people to understand. If you’re wearing these things, it’s about you.” He means the attention that will be received, the way the garment attracts curiosity. Like: “Why are you wearing two pairs of trousers?” Huelle says he also likes how these garments confuse signals. “People judge so quickly. They look at someone and what they’re wearing and think, ‘That’s who they are.’ But if they are wearing something that contrasts, you look at them and think, ‘I want to know this person.’ ” Maybe half-half garments expose the untruth we believe about our bodies — that they are symmetrical. Look in a mirror right now: one eye is higher than the other, shoulders slope differently, hips make us take an angled stance. Human bodies don’t all perfectly line up, why should clothes? ” Charlie Porter writes about “Hybrid” Clothes in the FINANCIAL TIMES

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“…Paris-based designer Lutz Huelle, who was invited by the council to close fashion week with a “best of” his last two collections at Berghain Friday night told Merkel, “As a German living outside of Germany, I can just say we are so proud of you.” To which there came a lively round of “hear, hear.” His praise wasn’t meant as a political party endorsement, he explained to WWD. “You have to be proud of anyone who shows humanity in these times, and you can’t ignore the human aspect of her work.” Melissa Drier on WWD on Angela Merkel meeting with members of the German Fashion Council and Designers at the Chancellory in Berlin

  to read the whole article click here MERKEL À LA MODE: For the three-year old Fashion Council Germany, it…